Opal

I'm small, blunt, and terribly useful. I build websites, specializing in compliant CSS and XHTML. I like quilting, cars, and critters.
I'm small, blunt, and terribly useful. I build websites, specializing in compliant CSS and XHTML. I like quilting, cars, and critters.
Star Table Runner for Karen

Star Table Runner for Karen

This is the longest version I’ve made of the star table runner – it’s SEVEN FEET LONG.

As you can see, it’s pretty comical on our little dining room table, but I’m sure it’ll be brilliant on Karen’s!

I quilted the beige background with clear nylon thread, so while you can see texture, you don’t see much of the meandering quilting. I did this to let the stars pop without competition.

 

Started: February 2017.
Finished: February 2017

This table runner is one of my Q1 finishes, for the 2017 FAL. See my Q1 list here.

Posted by Opal in Quilting
Romy’s One Block Wonder Quilt

Romy’s One Block Wonder Quilt

This is my second One Block Wonder quilt. It is a double, and intended to cover a futon in an office.

I free motion quilted this on a longarm in about 2 hours.

Quilt Started: February 2017.
Quilt Finished: March 26, 2017

This quilt is one of my Q1 finishes, for the 2017 FAL. See my Q1 list here.

Posted by Opal in Quilting
Gravity Quilt 2

Gravity Quilt 2

The second Gravity quilt got a 3.5 hour session on the longarm quilting machine. Having learned from my first session, I did a better job of managing the machine and had fewer glitches. I also decided to quilt the black to grey gradient area on the longarm, and managed to get the entire quilt done during my session!

Quilt Started: September 2016.
Quilt Finished: January 28, 2017

This quilt is one of my Q1 finishes, for the 2017 FAL. See my Q1 list here.

Posted by Opal in Quilting
Gravity Quilt 1

Gravity Quilt 1

The first Gravity quilt got a 4 hour session on the longarm quilting machine, and thanks to a threading mishap, I had to rip out 2.5 of the diamonds and redo them at home on my machine. I also had to finish the black to light grey areas of the quilt on my own machine, which was quite the upper arm workout.

In lessons learned, I did not trim the extra batting before removing the quilt from the longarm machine. BIG MISTAKE. The quilt ended up coated in lint that was hard to remove.

Quilt Started: September 2016.
Quilt Finished: January 31, 2017

This quilt is one of my Q1 finishes, for the 2017 FAL. See my Q1 list here.

Posted by Opal in Quilting
2017 FAL – Q1

2017 FAL – Q1

I hate clutter. Despite my attempts to keep my quilting projects corralled, the fabric and other supplies are stocking up. Therefore, I’m taking part in the 2017 Finish-A-Long to try to get a whole lot of space back.

This list is way too big for Q1. Probably even for the first half of the year! I figured I’d just make the big list and work my way through it. Maybe I can surprise myself. Continue reading →

Posted by Opal in Quilting
How to Make a String Quilt

How to Make a String Quilt

Mom's Stash String Quilt

Mom’s Stash String Quilt

Early in 2016, I started a quilt for a friend. She’d inherited part of her Mom’s stash of fabric and was looking for a way to turn it into a quilt. The fabric that wasn’t Christmas themed was mostly pale purple and pink.

The pair of us scoured pinterest, and eventually found some string quilts. So I started hacking away at the stash. The fabrics didn’t really go together, so the string quilt was a way to make it all gel. We choose black to make the diamond pattern, since a bold neutral was the only way to override the riot of colour.

I can’t honestly say how much fabric this quilt took, since I was dealing with random yardage from a stash, as well as my own cutoffs from other projects. This quilt is an excellent scrap buster; you can use random pieces or carve up yardage, it doesn’t matter.

Materials

  • 15″ square ruler
  • Rotary cutter and mat
  • A variety of fabric for the top, including one main sash colour (this tutorial assumes black)
  • Batting
  • Backing

Instructions

  1. Cut a variety of fabric into 8″ strips. These strips build the strips between the squares. I trimmed to 7.5″, so anything between 7.5″ and 8″ is fair game. Since I was using yardage, I cut my strips at 2″ x 8″. The odd cutoff from my own stash was larger or smaller than 2″ wide, but in general the strips were uniform.
  2. Sew a random selection of strips together to make a 21″ long band of fabric. Use a standard, scant 1/4″ seam allowance and press to one side.

    Step 2: assemble 8" strips into 21" long pieces

    Step 2: assemble 8″ strips into 21″ long pieces

  3. Trim the strips to 7.5″ wide. Then, cut the corners by aligning the square ruler so that diagonal points meet the center of either end of the strip:
    String quilt, trimmingTrimmed block center
  4. Add 2.5″ wide black bands to the long sides of the strip.
    Block center with black bands
    Cheater tip: I used 2.5″ strips because I wanted my binding to be black as well. This way I could cut my black fabric up and not worry about leftover strips, because I would use it as binding.
  5. Continue adding fabric to the black bands, checking with the ruler lined up to the points you trimmed to be sure you’re adding enough to complete the square. I like pressing and trimming as I add each band so that I’m sure it works. When you’re done adding fabric, your block will look something like this:
    Completed string block
  6. Align your blocks with the black sashing in alternating directions to create the squares:
    Laying out string quilt
    Try to keep identical fabrics away from each other as you layout your quilt to keep the randomness going. When sewing a row together, ensure your black sashing lines up:
    Align black sashing
  7. Once the quilt top is assembled, sandwich and quilt as desired. Bind with the remainder of the 2.5″ black fabric.
Posted by Opal in Quilting